Evangelical Lutheran Diocese of North America

Friday after the Eighth Sunday after Trinity Sunday

Posted on August 15, 2014 by Pastor Dulas under Devotions
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Scripture: 2 Samuel 5:1-25 (NKJV)

1 Then all the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and spoke, saying, “Indeed we are your bone and your flesh. 2 Also, in time past, when Saul was king over us, you were the one who led Israel out and brought them in; and the LORD said to you, ‘You shall shepherd My people Israel, and be ruler over Israel.'” 3 Therefore all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and King David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the LORD. And they anointed David king over Israel. 4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. 5 In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months, and in Jerusalem he reigned thirty-three years over all Israel and Judah.

6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who spoke to David, saying, “You shall not come in here; but the blind and the lame will repel you,” thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless David took the stronghold of Zion (that is, the City of David).

8 Now David said on that day, “Whoever climbs up by way of the water shaft and defeats the Jebusites (the lame and the blind, who are hated by David’s soul), he shall be chief and captain.” Therefore they say, “The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.” 9 Then David dwelt in the stronghold, and called it the City of David. And David built all around from the Millo and inward. 10 So David went on and became great, and the LORD God of hosts was with him.

11 Then Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, and carpenters and masons. And they built David a house. 12 So David knew that the LORD had established him as king over Israel, and that He had exalted His kingdom for the sake of His people Israel.

13 And David took more concubines and wives from Jerusalem, after he had come from Hebron. Also more sons and daughters were born to David. 14 Now these are the names of those who were born to him in Jerusalem: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon, 15 Ibhar, Elishua, Nepheg, Japhia, 16 Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet.

17 Now when the Philistines heard that they had anointed David king over Israel, all the Philistines went up to search for David. And David heard of it and went down to the stronghold. 18 The Philistines also went and deployed themselves in the Valley of Rephaim. 19 So David inquired of the LORD, saying, “Shall I go up against the Philistines? Will You deliver them into my hand?” And the LORD said to David, “Go up, for I will doubtless deliver the Philistines into your hand.” 20 So David went to Baal Perazim, and David defeated them there; and he said, “The LORD has broken through my enemies before me, like a breakthrough of water.” Therefore he called the name of that place Baal Perazim. 21 And they left their images there, and David and his men carried them away.

22 Then the Philistines went up once again and deployed themselves in the Valley of Rephaim. 23 Therefore David inquired of the LORD, and He said, “You shall not go up; circle around behind them, and come upon them in front of the mulberry trees. 24 And it shall be, when you hear the sound of marching in the tops of the mulberry trees, then you shall advance quickly. For then the LORD will go out before you to strike the camp of the Philistines.” 25 And David did so, as the LORD commanded him; and he drove back the Philistines from Geba as far as Gezer.


In today’s chapter we see David being thoroughly established as an honored king in Israel. Part of this includes making Jerusalem the place from where he rules the kingdom. From there he would go on to conquer the enemies of God’s people.

The name Jerusalem is sometimes translated “foundation of peace.” While David was an instrument through which God brought justice and prosperity in Israel, true peace would come through the Son of David, Christ Jesus the Lord!

Jerusalem was also the site where Abraham had been prepared to sacrifice Isaac, his miraculous only son. The Only-Begotten Son of the Father would finish the work of achieving peace between God and man by being sacrificed on the cross for the sins of the world. By His death on the cross He would conquer the greatest enemies of mankind: sin, death, and the Devil.

The theme of the blind and lame also points to Christ. The spiritually blind and lame Jews fought against Jesus, scoffing at His coming as the true Son of David. But they would be overcome as Christ showed His holy power. God’s Anointed showed Himself to be so by healing those who were blind, lame, and dead, yet made alive and well through faith in Him.

Thanks be to God that our foundation of peace is in Jesus Christ crucified, Who has redeemed us, and makes us to be His in His Kingdom through the blessing of His Holy Spirit. Amen.

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